BAFICI

March 19th, 2010 § 7 comments

Zach here. With exciting news, as promised.

I’ll be spending the middle portion of next month in chilly Argentina, where Bummer Summer (or Verano plomazo, as it is now also known) is going to be playing as part of the international competition.
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This festival is choice. I know because I was there two years ago and I loved it. I used to say during pre-production that the only reason I was making the movie was so that I could go back. I think I was joking, but even still I’m pretty excited for this one. Our fellow competitors include some serious heavy hitters, including the new Safdie brothers’ film Go Get Some Rosemary , the Oscar-nominated Ajami, and Police, Adjective, already rearing its Romanian head in theaters across the country.

You can check out the festival’s page for our movie here. If you feel like trying your hand at some Spanish, the synopsis they wrote is really awesome. The festival’s schedule isn’t up yet, but it should be next week. As soon as I know more I’ll be back with an update for all of our Argentinian readers (I know of at least one!) so they can plan on attending.

Clom OUt.

§ 7 Responses to BAFICI"

  • for all of us non spanish speakers (thanks to google translate):

    Summer with the vitality and confusion of adolescence is over, and located right at the time where games of childhood are becoming nostalgic memories of an idealized past. In his seventeen years, Isaac away from the school to initiate a series of tiny mishaps, but without direction and without a map, sealing their friendship with Ben and his girlfriend, Lila. The directorial debut of Zach Weintraub portrays the light of a summer of initiation, but without any emphasis, through a black and white ensure that achieves all the sentimentality, but it subtracts the value of the thrill of freedom of the experience. Weintraub made this film after leaving Tisch, the same school where he studied Jarmusch (whose traces can be seen in Summer Bummer as a radical departure). And in the successful legacy of formal synthesis, purification with a visual narrative, he leaves everything dramatic effect and aesthetic of American film-even certain vices of the current independent scene, to go to meet the challenge of a film originally revealing.

  • admin says:

    Obviously a shaky translation, but it gets the gist across. To clear up a few misleading bits: the “he studied Jarmusch” part is actually saying that Jarmusch also studied there. Also, the “he leaves everything dramatic effect and aesthetic of American film” bit means to say “he moves away from” etc… But the rest is pretty figure-out-able.

  • Katie says:

    te felicito!

  • Clome says:

    Sheesh Dusty, I was about to post the same thing you did.

    Shoot.

  • Amy says:

    Sheesh Dusty, I was about to post the same thing you did.

    Shoot.

  • Rick says:

    Sheesh Dusty, I was about to post the same thing you did.

    Shoot.

  • Jeff says:

    Sheesh Dusty, I was about to post the same thing you did.

    Shoot.

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